10 Great Resources Writers Need to Know

10 Great Resources Writers Need to Know

Here is a  list of resources for writers that I love and that I believe will make your lives easier. Some will save you money and others will help you to polish your books.

So let’s get’s started with my list of 10 great resources writers need to know about and in some cases start using today.

Make Banners and Images for Pinterest & Social Media

Canva

Have you ever experienced Facebook banner envy? You know, those beautiful Timeline banners that some people pay a great deal of money to graphic designers to create?

Guess what? Canva, a free application, is a tool you can use to create Facebook banners, Twitter headers, cards business cards, photo cards, other image-based messaging, and even book covers. It’s an easy, intuitive tool to use.

Here are a few samples of items I recently created with Canva. First, here’s my Facebook banner.


10 Great Resources Writers Need to Know

Here’s a promotional image I made for an upcoming promotional sale of my book.

I created this image for a client.

I also made this book cover on Canva.

Canva offers free and fee-based templates and images for book covers. See this sample.

Canva book templates

 

Find Canva’s book cover templates and image on this page.

Canva features some images that you can purchase for $1 or you can upload your own. Many of the images and features are free of charge.

PicMonkey

I’ve used PicMonkey to resize and crop photos. But recently I wanted to create some images for Pinterest so I upgraded to the paid plan, about $7.99/month or $71.88/year for the basic plan. Here are a couple of examples of my creations.

Write a Book That Inspires You

And here’s a holiday collage for Pinterest I created just for fun.

Holiday Collage

Once you create and save the images, you can share them directly to Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, Flickr, or Tumblr as well as send them via email to a colleague. You can also use this tool to create Facebook covers or perhaps a collage of some of the books you’ve written. You can also upload your own images.

Pablo

Pablo is a great little application from the people at Buffer, which is a scheduling tool. Anyway, Pablo is perhaps the easiest image app on the internet.

When you navigate to Pablo, you’ll see a column of free (yes free!) images. Just select the image you want to use, enter the text, select the size, and the contrast and your set.

Pablo

Here’s a simple image I made using Pablo.

What’s great is that once you create an image, you can schedule it to Buffer in one easy step.

Pixabay

Pixabay is my go-to place for copyright free images. When you need pictures for your blog or to use as a background for a quote, this is the place to go.

Images are free and in nearly every conceivable topic area. Upload your own images as you sign up for hassle-free downloads. You’ll love this site.

Social Media Scheduling App

SocialOomph

I’ve been using this social media scheduler for years and love it. It’s only practical for LinkedIn and Twitter so if you want to also schedule to Facebook (bad idea because Facebook downgrades scheduled posts in the newsfeed), or Pinterest or Instagram, then use Pinterest.

But with SocialOomph, you can schedule posts, set a recurring update so the post can reappear, have access to analytics, monitor interest channels, and see your feed without going to Twitter, this is the app for you.

As a backup, I recommend Buffer. It’s super easy to set up and use and the customer service is awesome. (The customer service at Social Oomph is great too.)

DIY Tools for Designing Your Next Book

DIY Book Covers

After writing your book you need a great cover. You can hire a designer or you can try to create a cover yourself.

Self-published authors on a tight budget might want to try a DIY tool. Cover designer Derek Murphy of CreativIndie Covers has put together a package of book cover design templates.

Although it sounds like an unlikely pairing, the templates look clean and professional, not only for simple non-fiction covers, but also for all types of fiction. If you’re familiar with using MS Word, customizing the templates to make them unique shouldn’t be difficult.

There’s even a tool on this website to help you make a 3D mockup of your book.

Endorsed by Matt Stone, Pat Flynn, and Joanna Penn, this tool is the real deal.

Book Design Templates and More

Joel FriedlanderAre you tired of paying the high cost of a graphic designer for the layout of your book? Joel Friedlander’s Book Design Templates let Indie authors quickly and easily create the interior layout of their books. There are templates for fiction, memoir, narrative non-fiction, reference, and technical and non-fiction books. In addition, there are templates for children’s books and more.

Plus, Joel offers templates for book covers, and toolkits for blogging, social media, public relations, book launches, and self-publishing on Amazon. Here’s the link to all of his other toolkits, including mine.  😎

Joel is a book designer so self-published authors can trust that the templates carefully balance typographic beauty with ease of reading.

Although I haven’t yet used the template I purchased, a colleague has and she said the process was easy. If you need help, Joel’s team will upload your book into your purchased template. Finally, each template comes with different kinds of interior pages, section breaks, running heads, and page numbers.

These templates will save writers money and help them to produce books that appear professionally designed.

By the way, self-published authors should all become acquainted with Joel’s blog, The Book Designer. You will learn everything you need to know about self-publishing, social media, book covers, and book marketing by reading his posts.

Every Author Needs an Editor

Jordan E. Rosenfeld

Jordan

Jordan says that she has a simple philosophy in her editing, coaching and teaching: “Practice. Polish. Persist.”

She advises, “Make your writing life into an ongoing, deep writing practice that can survive the test of time, discouragement and change. Never stop trying to become better and polish your work, learn new things, take classes and feed both your muse and your craft. But what will set you apart is your persistence. Don’t give up. If you need help with any of these things, I’m here to help you.”

Jordan brings an editor’s attention to both the micro and macro aspects of your fiction project, but she also brings a writer’s ear—having been writing and publishing for two decades (author of the novels Forged in Grace and Women in Red and the writing guides Writing the Intimate Character, A Writer’s Guide to PersistenceWriting Deep Scenes, and Make a Scene & Write Free).

She likes to work with fiction writers at all stages—from the seed of an idea, to the final product—and at all levels, whether the writer needs coaching or a final copyedit. She is especially fond of developmental edits and critiques.

Robbi S. Bryant

Robbi S. BryantAnother wonderful and popular editor is Robbi S. Bryant. She says that an editor does a lot more than correcting grammar and sentence structure. “I am a content editor, which means I review everything from grammar to the breakdown of the story—including focus on plot, scene, character arcs, story arcs, pacing, subtext, dialogue, theme, and voice. In other words, I am a developmental editor, a copy editor, and a proofreader.”

As an award-winning author, she has honed her skills. Over the years, her focus has shifted from writing her own work to helping others write theirs.

She offers a free 10-page edit so potential clients can get a feel for her style.

Robbi says that it’s important for a writer to be comfortable with an editor. Trust is essential. She describes herself as a gentle, thoughtful, and light-handed editor. Respect is crucial as is communication.  She says that she offers all this and more.

Her books include a novella, four novels, five short-story collections, and one book of poetry. She has been published in magazines including Readers DigestRedbook, Penthouse, college textbooks, and several anthologies. As editor in chief of the Redwood Writers 2018 anthology, she supervised the creation and publication of Redemption: Stories From the Edge. Her work was also optioned twice for television’s Movie of the Week, and she appeared on TV’s Jane Whitney Show to discuss her article, “A Victim’s Revenge.”

Go Wide with Your Publishing

Draft2Digital

When you’re ready to go wide with publishing your books, Draft2Digital is the best service available to get your book on more venues than just Amazon.

What’s wonderful about Draft2Digital is that authors are in charge and because they’ve been where you are, they know how important it is to provide informative and quick customer service.

There is no fee for using this service. Draft2Digital will take a 10% commission when your books sell. But if you want to price your books at $0 permanently, that’s fine too.

The people behind Draft2Digital are truly cool and supportive. Try them out for yourself.

I hope you enjoyed reviewing my list of resources for writers. I’d love to hear about your favorite resources too!

 

Social Media Just for Writers is now just $1.99!

Social Media Just for Writers 2nd Edition

Well written, well researched – well thought out. This book is a must have!

Ryshia Kennie 

Frances CaballoAuthor of this blogFrances Caballo is an author and social media strategist and manager for writers. She wrote several social media books including Social Media Just for Writers and The Author’s Guide to Goodreads. Her focus is on helping authors surmount the barriers that keep them from flourishing online, building their platform, and finding new readers. Her clients have included authors of every genre and writers’ conferences. Not sure how you’re doing online? Sign up for her free email course.

Practical tips for marketing your books on the social web

9 Best Practices to Boost Your LinkedIn Profile

LinkedIn
Writers tend to be quick to build followings on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, but what about LinkedIn? Sometimes it seems as though this powerhouse of a social media platform gets overlooked.

When I first began to use social media, I started a Facebook profile and then a LinkedIn account. For quite some time, I poured a great deal of energy and time into LinkedIn because I loved the level of conversation in the groups I joined.

People graciously shared their expertise. Were they looking for clients? Sure. But they also disseminated information that I was able to put to use in my writing and marketing.

Lately, however, I’ve all but ignored LinkedIn except when I write a new post or use LinkedIn’s publishing platform.

My focus is instead on my Facebook page and Twitter, and to a lesser degree Pinterest and Google+. So writing this post is helping me to recall why LinkedIn is an important part of a writer’s marketing platform (including mine). And if you’re a nonfiction writer/editor/bookcoach/designer, LinkedIn is where you’ll most likely to find clients.

Four Facts About LinkedIn You Need to Know

Presently, LinkedIn enjoys more than 500 million users.

  • When I review the demographics for LinkedIn, I realize that considering the education of most users and their average salary ($50,000), most of these users are probably avid readers as well.

Sixty-one percent of LinkedIn users live outside of the U.S.

  • Wouldn’t you love to sell your books everywhere English spoken? LinkedIn can help to promote your books to an international audience, just as Twitter can.

Two new users join LinkedIn every second.

  • This network continues to grow. It’s important to be on social media channels that are dynamic and resistant to stagnation.

There are 2 million groups on LinkedIn and 81% of users join at least one.

  • If you’re not in a group, join a few today. This is where you can share your expertise, help others, make new connections, gain more Twitter followers, and join in conversations that will further your understanding in your niche.

9 LinkedIn Best Practices

 Reacquaint yourself to LinkedIn by following these best practices.

  1. Think about keywords when you review your profile. What words is someone most likely to type into a Google search bar in order to find the type of book you’ve written? Have you published a book about gardening in Northern California? Then use those keywords.
  2. Use bullet points to make your specialties stand out. The human eye does not like long blocks of black text. Type your specialties in Word or Pages and then cut and paste them onto your LinkedIn profile.
  3. Connect with people you know. Are colleagues from your book club and writing groups on LinkedIn? Look for them. Did you make new friends at a writers conference? Search for them. Connect with as many people as you can.
  4. Give (and receive) recommendations. Did you hire one of your connections to edit your most recent book? Why not offer a recommendation? If you give testimonials, they will be easier to drum up for yourself.
  5. Personalize your LinkedIn URL. For example, mine is www.linkedin.com/in/francescaballo/. Once you personalize your URL, include it in your email signature to encourage your colleagues to connect with you.
  6. Update your status daily. It’s best to post between 7 and 7:30 am and 5 – 5:30 pm, M-F. However, on Fridays the afternoon post should be no later than 3:30 pm.
  7. Join groups. After you join couple, try to remain actively involved.
  8. Install special features that LinkedIn offers, such as the publications feature. This will help you to showcase the books and stories you’ve written.
  9. When other users endorse you, be sure to thank them and given them an endorsement as well.

Fiction Writers

LinkedIn is not a site that fiction writers need to update regularly. However, I do recommend that you create a complete profile and join a couple of groups to continue your education on writing and marketing your books.

Continue your learning cover on LinkedIn and other social media platforms by buying Social Media Just for Writers.

 

Social Media Just for Writers 2nd Edition

Whether you’re setting up your social media for the first time or wanting to take it to the next level, get the newest edition of Social Media Just for Writers.

Well written, well researched – well thought out. This book is a must have!

Ryshia Kennie 

Frances CaballoAuthor of this blogFrances Caballo is an author and social media strategist and manager for writers. She’s a regular speaker at the San Francisco Writers Conference and a contributing writer at TheBookDesigner.com. Frances wrote several social media books including Social Media Just for Writers and The Author’s Guide to Goodreads. Her focus is on helping authors surmount the barriers that keep them from flourishing online, building their platform, and finding new readers. Her clients have included authors of every genre and writers’ conferences. Not sure how you’re doing online? Sign up for her free email course.

Practical tips for marketing your books on the social web

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7 Tips to Networking on the Social Web (Part 1)

3-10-14

Don’t you get tired of broadcast media?

I unplugged my Comcast cable eight years ago, and I’ve never regretted it.

Television programming would interrupt my favorite shows with annoying and idiotic commercials and cancel the few programs I really liked.

The worst part is that I had to conform my personal schedule to my favorite program’s schedule.

In comparison, social media is perfect.

There are no interruptions, and I can visit the networks whenever I have time and the inclination.

And it allows me to interact with colleagues and friends across the country and around the world.

Most importantly, social media enables me to nurture relationships with readers and friends. Petty cool, huh?

Just as a reminder, setting aside time to be social is the fourth step in my four-step cure to social media suck. Here are the four steps:

  1. Be where your readers are.
  2. Curate information in your niche every morning.
  3. Select an application and schedule your tweets, posts and updates.
  4. Make time to be social every day.

Make Time to be Social

Social media is all about nurturing relationships.

Did someone retweet one of your messages? Find a tweet they wrote that you like and return the favor. While you’re at it, consider sending a note of thanks to everyone who retweeted you.

Do you have new followers? Spend some time getting acquainted with them by reviewing their profiles or visiting their websites. (It only takes a second or two.)

Is there an agent or editor on LinkedIn with whom you’d like to connect, but can’t because they are a third degree connection? Ask a friend to introduce you.

Did a colleague just publish a new book? Help her promote it by informing your friends and connections about it.

Socializing on social media involves these three steps: meet, connect, and repeat. You are constantly meeting new people, connecting with them, and then repeating the process with someone new.

Remember to be positive and open-minded and stick to neutral topics.

If you have an iPad, iPhone, laptop or Android, you can socialize online whenever you have some idle time. (If you don’t have idle time, then it’s important to schedule some in.)

[Read more…]

3 Basic Rules of Social Media Plus 5 Best Practices

3 Basic Rules of Social Media Plus 5 Best Practices
Dan Zarrella, author of The Science of Marketing, said in his book, “I’ve long been interested in the idea that engaging in conversation is the single most important function of social media marketing.”

He’s right. That is why it’s so important to schedule time in the afternoon or early evening to converse with our readers, friends, and influencers in your sphere. If you don’t allocate time to converse, you are missing the point.

Social media at its essence is social so to engage in social media and not allocate time to socializing, well, it’s antithetical to the very premise of social media.

Social media at its essence is socialClick To Tweet

Take Twitter, for example. It began as a texting platform. Sure, it’s matured, evolved, and changed. You can include images and video now, and you can even advertise. But at its essence, it’s still a medium for conveying messages.

This premise is true with other social media platforms as well.

Which takes me to those 3 basic rules of social media I promised to discuss.

[Read more…]

Friday Roundup: Twitter Tips for Indie Authors

12-12-14 Twitter Tips for Indie Authors

Welcome to the Friday Roundup where you’ll find practical tips for marketing your books on the social web. This week’s segment of the Friday Roundup focuses on Twitter Tips for Indie Authors.


[smart_track_player url=”http://traffic.libsyn.com/socialmediaforauthorspodcast/Episode_11_FINAL.mp3″ color=”d8570b” title=”Twitter Hacks for Authors” artist=”Frances Caballo” ]

Let’s talk about hashtags. They can be confusing to users new to Twitter, but they’re actually quite simple.

A hashtag is a word preceded by what some of us still know as the pound sign, #. When the word and the pound sign join they form a hashtag, and that becomes hyperlinked and thus searchable on Twitter.

Hashtags can help you to expand your online readership by attracting users who are searching for the genre or topic you write about. Likewise, they can help you find people who love to read.

[Read more…]

How to Stop Wasting Time and Focus Your Book Marketing

10-6-14 Frances CaballoFacebook. Twitter. LinkedIn. Pinterest. Google+. Instagram. Tumblr. Rebelmouse.

Do we really need to be on all of these social media networks?

I remember when I was about to publish my first book a search engine optimization consultant advised me to build a Facebook page and Twitter account for every book I write. I took his advice and created my Social Media Just for Writers Facebook page.

Thank goodness the title of my book became the name of my business and this website. Can you imagine if I had continued to follow his advice and then created Facebook pages for Avoid Social Media Time Suck, Blogging Just for Writers and Pinterest Just for Writers?

It wouldn’t have made sense because I would have been splitting my target audience.

Besides, who has the time or energy to maintain multiple Facebook pages and Twitter accounts? I don’t.

I admit that I did start two other Twitter accounts with good intentions but after a few months, I then shut the extra accounts down. I could justify having two Twitter accounts if I were marketing to two completely different demographics, but I’m not.

Even when I finally get around to finishing my novel, I’ll still use my present Twitter account and turn my focus to readers who are interested in politics in Spain.

Conserve Your Book Marketing Energy

We’re all aware of needing to curb our carbon footprint. But what about our personal energy? You’re a writer, and that means that what you love to do most is write. However, if you want to sell your books beyond the borders of your city, you also need to become an Indie marketer.

Social media marketing is the equalizing force in Indie marketing. You now have at your disposal all of the online tools that Amanda Hocking and Isabel Allende have.

Social media marketing is the equalizing force in Indie marketing via @CaballoFrancesClick To Tweet

Remember Sharon Hamilton’s story? I interviewed her on this blog a few weeks ago. She began writing about eight years ago and quickly got into self-publishing. She’s now a powerhouse in the Romance genre, and she accomplished that by staunchly sticking to her writing schedule, blogging, and building and rewarding her Facebook fan base.

She doesn’t create a new Facebook page for each book she writes. That would be ludicrous. She has 13,000 fans so why wouldn’t she want to build her page further? That would do more for her SEO than multiple Facebook pages.

Which Social Media Networks Should You Use?

 

I always advise clients to start their online marketing by selecting one social media network. Once you feel comfortable with that one, then consider another social platform depending on your genre.

My advice has changed over the years. I used to tell conference attendees to diversify their social media presence. My reasoning was that prospective readers may be on Facebook but not Twitter. Or a devotee of LinkedIn might abhor Facebook.

I don’t agree with that philosophy anymore.

It’s more important to be clear about your reader demographic. Once you know for whom you’re writing, then I suggest using the social media networks that your demographic prefers.

For example, if you write Romance novels I recommend a presence on Facebook and Pinterest. Women dominate these networks. In fact, 80 percent of Pinterest users are women so it would be worthwhile for Romance writers to delegate some time to this platform.

If you write YA, you need to be on the social media networks that your demographic prefers. Those would include Twitter, Tumblr and Instagram.

Do you write nonfiction? Then LinkedIn will be a must for you. Create a professional profile and join and participate in some groups. Over time, you may even want to start your own group. Depending on the age range of your demographic, and depending on your energy, you’ll also want to be on Twitter.

How do you manage your time on social media?

Also see:

7 Reasons Why Writers Need to Use Social Media

56 Social Media Terms Writers Need to Know

 

 

Social Media Just for Writers is now just $1.99! But the sale price won’t last forever so get your copy now! It includes a chapter on blogging.

Social Media Just for Writers 2nd Edition

Well written, well researched – well thought out. This book is a must have!

Ryshia Kennie 

Frances CaballoAuthor of this blogFrances Caballo is an author and social media strategist and manager for writers. She wrote several social media books including Social Media Just for Writers and The Author’s Guide to Goodreads. Her focus is on helping authors surmount the barriers that keep them from flourishing online, building their platform, and finding new readers. Her clients have included authors of every genre and writers’ conferences. Not sure how you’re doing online? Sign up for her free email course.

Practical tips for marketing your books on the social web

 

 

15 Pinterest Tips for Authors

9-22-14 - PinterestWhenever I feel tired after spending hours of reading emails, blog posts, tweets and Facebook updates, I sneak over to Pinterest and feast on the images.

Don’t mistake me Pinterest isn’t just a vacation for the eyes – although I love it for that reason alone. It is also a powerful social media network that, according to research, will send more traffic to your website than Facebook.

Writers often wonder how they can make the most of their Pinterest accounts. Here are some suggestions to get you started.

Pinterest Tips for Authors

  1. Open a business account, not a profile. Starting with a business account will enable you to view analytics.
  2. Create a pinboard for your blog and upload the images that you post there. Whenever you pin images from your website, blog or Amazon, the web address will attach to the image. Then when other users repin your image, they will travel to your website when the click the image a second time or click on “Visit Website.”
  3. Do you have trouble getting your writing started in the morning. Create a pinboard of visual writing prompts and share them on Twitter and Facebook.
  4. Repin images that represent the venues where characters in your novels and stories live and travel to.
  5. Find images that represent the clothing your characters wear and the meals they enjoy.
  6. Create a pinboard of your favorite books (and include your own!).
  7. Create a pinboard of your favorite quotes by authors you admire.
  8. Create a pinboard of quotes about the writing process.
  9. Create a pinboard of book covers written by your colleagues.
  10. Do you love bookstores? Create a pinboard of beautiful bookstores from around the world.
  11. Writers love libraries, right? Create a pinboard of libraries from around the world.
  12. Create pinboards that represent the stories you’d like to write.
  13. Create a pinboard of pictures of your favorite authors.
  14. Create a pinboard of images that visualize scenes and moods in your book.
  15. If you wrote nonfiction, create a pinboard of Infographics about your chosen topic.

To see additional examples of pinboards that writers can create, check out the Writer’s Relief account.

Embed Pinterest into Your WordPress Blog

Once you create your pinboards, you can share them on your WordPress Blog as I have done below, and over in the right column. Simply navigate to this link, select the type of widget you’d like to create, and include the URL to your pinboard.

Follow Frances Caballo’s board Writing Prompts on Pinterest.

 

Social Media Time Suck Final 200About the Author: Frances Caballo is a social media manager and for writers and is the author of Avoid Social Media Time Suck: A Blueprint for Writers to Create Online Buzz for Their Books and Still Have Time to Write. This book includes schedules, strategies, and applications that will save you time on social media so that you’ll have more time to write.

Practical Tips for Marketing Your Books on the Social Web

photo credit: mkhmarketing via photopin cc

7 Reasons Why Authors Need to Use Social Media

Why Writers Need to Use Social Media

So you wrote a book and you’ve sold it to every friend, colleague and family member alive.

Now what?

You didn’t spend countless hours writing and revising your book and pay for editing and graphics just so you could sell a few books.

For indie authors, writing and publishing books is as much a business endeavor as it is an artistic experience.

Think about the money you spent on writer’s conferences and workshops in our efforts to improve our craft. Consider the number of books we purchase on dialogue, plot and poetry.

And think about your goals. You want your book to fly off the bookshelves, right? You at least want to recoup your expenses. To reach your goals, you will need to become active on social media so that you can reach a body of readers who live well beyond your zip code range.

Not convinced? Here are seven reasons why having an active social media presence is essential for today’s self-published authors.

7 Reasons to Use Social Media to Market Your Books

  1. Social media networks inform the world about your website and blog. Every author needs a website and a blog; that’s a given. But how will anyone know you have a website if you don’t use social media? And what about your blog? If you are updating it weekly, which you need to do, who will know you went to the trouble to write a new post if you don’t syndicate it to your social media networks?
  2. Social media can attract a wider audience to your readings. It’s great that you invite friends, colleagues and book club members to your readings. I’m sure there are other people in your community who might like to attend as well. Facebook is especially good at spreading the word because your friends can share your posts with their friends and soon you’ll have plenty of people to fill the seats.
  3. Social media platforms strengthen the bond between your readers and you. Social media gives your readers an opportunity to communicate directly with you. They don’t have to go through a publicist; they can send you a tweet or a private message via Facebook and LinkedIn. Or they can ask a question in a comment on Facebook or even add their posts to your Timeline. The same is true for other social media networks. By enabling your readers to contact you directly, you can nurture your relationship with them.
  4. Social media offers opportunities for you to promote your books. There is a caveat with this suggestion. You can use social media to promote your books, blog posts, readings, websites, sales, etc., but you don’t want to overdo it. The general rule is that you can promote your news in 20% of your posts; in 80% of your posts you will tweet and inform your following of blog posts that other experts in your niche have written.
  5. Social media enables you to build your brand. You are your brand. What you blog about, write about, and post about defines who you are to your readers. For example, my books are about how writers can use social media. I tweet about social media, I teach social media, and the majority of my social media posts are about social media. Because my audience is authors, some of my social media posts are about writing. For example, my Pinterest account has numerous boards on social media infographics but I also have pinboards with quotes from famous writers, pictures of interesting libraries and bookstores, images of bookshelves, and quotes about the love of reading. I also have writing-related pinboards. Everything I post or pin on social media reflects my brand.
  6. Social media will increase your inbound traffic. You want traffic to your blog and website, right? Traffic to your website and blog will increase when you inform the world about them via your social media channels. You can track the number of visits by signing up for Google Analytics (it’s free) and watching trends in your inbound traffic.
  7. Social media will decrease your marketing costs. You could hire a publicist, but publicists can sometimes be expensive. With social media, you reduce your costs and take full control of your social web presence.

Social Media Just for Writers is now just $1.99! It won’t be at this price forever so get it now.

Social Media Just for Writers 2nd Edition

Well written, well researched – well thought out. This book is a must have!

Ryshia Kennie 

Frances CaballoAuthor of this blogFrances Caballo is an author and social media strategist and manager for writers. She wrote several social media books including Social Media Just for Writers and The Author’s Guide to Goodreads. Her focus is on helping authors surmount the barriers that keep them from flourishing online, building their platform, and finding new readers. Her clients have included authors of every genre and writers’ conferences. Not sure how you’re doing online? Sign up for her free email course.

Practical Tips for Marketing Your Books on the Social Web

Friday Roundup: Online Resources for Authors

9-12-14 Tools for Writers

Every Friday I compile a list of online resources for authors to help newly published writers market their books on the social web. I hope you enjoy this week’s selection.


 

Chrome Extensions for The Writer, from Writer.ly: As a reader, I embrace all kinds of books. As a writer, I embrace all kinds of writing: longhand, MS Word, Scrivener, and Evernote. I use them for different purposes, however. All things said and done, my laptop is the center of my writing existence. And Chrome, the browser is one of my most reliable research and sharing tools. Here are a few Chrome extensions that I swear by:

15 Twitter Hacks That Will Turn You Into a Twitter Ninja from the Buffer Blog by Neil Patel: Once you pick up on these power user features, you’ll become a Twitter ninja.

10 Awesome Twitter Analytics and Visualization Tools from the Twitter Tools & Tips Blog: After researching over a thousand Twitter Tools for the Twitter Tools Book I came across many Twitter analytics and visualization tools.  These Twitter tools were designed to add value by presenting a different way to visualize or analyze your tweets, the people in your network, and the tweets from the people in your network.

Two Questions Every New Author Asks from The Future of InkEvery author I’ve met has asked me the same set of questions: How did you know how to price your book? And What do I need to do to encourage/boost sales? Do they sound familiar? We’ve all asked these questions – I know I did – when approaching publishing for the first time. So let’s address them one-by-one.

Template For Success: 5 Keys to Creating A Winning Social Media Plan by Stuart Leung for Forbes: With social networks becoming more and more ingrained in everyday business communication and gaining widespread acceptance as a marketing channel, your company needs to know how to connect with your consumer base. So, do you have a plan around social media?

Also See:

Blogging Just for Writers

Social Media Just for Writers

Avoid Social Media Time Suck (social media time-management strategies for authors)

Twitter Just for Writers (free & on this website)

 

About the Author: Frances Caballo is a social media manager for writers and author of  Avoid Social Media Time Suck: A Blueprint for Writers to Create Online Buzz for Their Books and Still Have Time to Write, Social Media Just for Writers: The Best Online Marketing Tips for Selling Your Books and Blogging Just for Writers. Presently, she is the Social Media Manager for the Women’s National Book Association-SF Chapter and the San Francisco Writers Conference. You can find her on FacebookTwitterLinkedInPinterest, and Google+.

Practical Tips for Marketing Your Books on the Social Web

 

Photo credit: Brigitte Werner via Pixabay.com

Blogging, Twitter Tips and Resources for Indie Authors

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It’s Friday and that means it’s time for the weekly Roundup of the week’s best posts. I hope

Blogging, Twitter Tips and Resources

32 Web ‪Writing Tips for Better Blog Posts and Social Media Posts, Buffer Blog: Content Crafter Kevan Lee joined us for #Bufferchat to talk about the unique nature of writing for the web. Check out the full Storify recap here, and continue reading for 32 web writing tips from Kevan and the community about how to write successful blogposts, tweets, status updates, and more.

20 Simple Tips for Writing a Blog Post that Begs to be Read, Jeff Bullas: On average, 8 out of 10 people will read headline copy, but only 2 out of 10 will read the rest. This is the secret to the power of your title and why it so highly determines the effectiveness of the entire article.

Top 30 Websites for Indie Authors, Penny Sansevieri of Author Marketing Experts: Trying to build your writing and publishing career is a challenge. There’s a lot of information out there, and trying to discern a solid piece of advice from fluff or inaccurate data isn’t always easy. We are lucky to know a lot of really outstanding industry people who offer great insights, super tips, and valued feedback on a variety of marketing topics and publishing options. Here’s our list of the top 30 blogs and bloggers we really respect. We hope you’ll follow them, too!

4 Ways Authors Can Rock on Twitter by Frances Caballo, on Joel Friedlander’s blogOver the years, I’ve learned how to improve metrics on this platform, and I’m going to share with you four key steps to rocking on Twitter.

Secrets to a Powerful Blog Post by Rebekah RadiceAs a blogger, finding the right words can make all the difference. And today, with more than 152 million blogs on the Internet, that difference can determine your success.

Blogging Just for Writers by Frances CaballoBlogging Just for Writers: Written for new and experienced bloggers, this book provides, tips, ideas for topics and a review of the best blogging applications.

 

 

About the Author: Frances Caballo is a social media manager for writers and author of  Avoid Social Media Time Suck: A Blueprint for Writers to Create Online Buzz for Their Books and Still Have Time to Write, Social Media Just for Writers: The Best Online Marketing Tips for Selling Your Books and Blogging Just for Writers. Presently, she is the Social Media Manager for the Women’s National Book Association-SF Chapter and the San Francisco Writers Conference. You can find her on FacebookTwitterLinkedInPinterest, and Google+.

Practical Tips for Marketing Your Books on the Social Web