Indie Author Weekly Update – February 16, 2018

Indie Author Weekly Update

This week’s Indie Author Update includes posts that I really like. Yeah, I suppose I shouldn’t use the word really but how else to describe these posts other than to use the word love, which just wouldn’t work in this context.

So please read Jane Friedan’s post on book reviews because this is a question every author asks me. Dave Chesson’s post on Amazon categories is brilliant as usual. And if you want your book to be a BookBub featured deal, you absolutely must read the first post listed below. All the posts below are must-reads.

And have a great weekend, too!

How to Boost Your Chances of Getting a BookBub Featured Deal from BookBub: “In the past, we’ve posted tips and busted myths about getting accepted for a BookBub Featured Deal, and we’ve even listed the top reasons a book is rejected! Since we still get questions on how to bolster one’s chances of getting selected for a Featured Deal, we decided to put together a visual “cheat sheet.” We hope this helps you better understand what our editors are looking for when reviewing submissions, whether you’ve submitted deals before and are looking for a refresher or you’re a new partner in need of a first-time overview.”

Secret Method to Choosing Amazon Book Categories in KDP from Dave Chesson: “The Amazon book categories you choose will have a direct effect on whether or not you become an Amazon Best Seller. Choose the wrong one, and no matter how many books you sell, you won’t become an Amazon bestseller. In truth, there is a lot more to choosing Amazon book categories in KDP, like secret categories that Amazon doesn’t tell you about when publishing, and the simple fact that you can actually be listed for 7 categories legitimately.”

The New Facebook Algorithm: Secrets Behind How It Works and What You Can Do To Succeed from Buffer: “The Facebook algorithm is constantly evolving in order to provide a better experience for users. But few changes to the algorithm have sparked as much interest and conversation as the recent ‘meaningful interactions’ update, in which Facebook said it would be prioritizing posts that create meaningful conversations, especially those from family and friends.”

Five Marketing Tools for Authors Who Hate Marketing from Writer Unboxed: “Disclaimer: Hating marketing is not required to use these tools. In fact, if you enjoy marketing, you’ll have a blast using them. I’m active in several online writing communities, and one of the most frequent things I read about is how much authors hate marketing. It’s usually accompanied by talk about art and creativity, and once in a while someone tosses this suggestion across the virtual meeting room: all you have to do is write a great story and they will come.”

How to Market a Kindle Book: 10 Easy Marketing Strategies for New Authors from Sabrina Ricci: “Writing your book was hard enough, now you have to market it? Oh man… Never fear, here are 10 easy strategies to sell more copies of your book.”

The Essential First Step for New Authors: Book Reviews, Not Sales from Jane Friedman: “You know how good your work is. You created it. You lived with it through the phases of publication gestation: idea, brainstorming, outline, research, writing, and rewriting. You have improved, enhanced, and polished your work to a degree you didn’t think possible. You believe it’s perfect.”

Quote of the Week

Mary Mackey

Frances CaballoAuthor of this blogFrances Caballo is an author and social media strategist and manager for writers. She’s a contributing writer at TheBookDesigner.com and has written several social media books including the 2nd edition of Social Media Just for Writers and The Author’s Guide to Goodreads. Her focus is on helping authors surmount the barriers that keep them from flourishing online, building their platform, finding new readers, and selling more books. Her clients include authors of every genre and writers’ conferences. Not sure how you’re doing online? Sign up for my free email course.

Practical tips for marketing your books on the social web

 

Get Your Visuals Seen!

Get your visuals on Pinterest. But first learn how to use Pinterest. Pick up a copy of my book, Pinterest Just for Writers!

 

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Need Visuals For Your Social Media? Try These Apps

 

Need Visuals For Your Social Media? Try These Apps

I have never described myself as a visual person. I can open the refrigerator door, frustrated when I see there’s “nothing to eat,” and fail to notice a big, fresh salad that my husband made for me in the morning.

Or I can walk into a friend’s home and miss the freshly painted walls or wallpaper newly added to the entry.

If I happened to witness an accident, I would be hard-pressed to give the police any details. I wouldn’t recall the color of the car or details about the suspect.

Despite this quirk of mine, I am always drawn to social media images. In fact, I more often gloss over (or not read at all) wordy posts on Facebook and instead jump ahead to the beautiful pictures, funny memes, and short, meaningful quote graphics.

Visual Content Rules

I’m not the only one who prefers visual posts over text. Look at these statistics from Wishpond.com:

  • 90% of information transmitted to the brain is visual. Visuals are processed 60,000 times faster in the brain than text.
  • Videos on landing pages increase average page conversion rates by 86%.
  • Visual content is social-media-ready and social-media-friendly. It’s easily shareable and easily palatable.
  • Posts with visuals receive 94% more page visits and engagement than those without.
  • 67% of consumers consider clear, detailed images to carry more weight than product information or customer ratings

Keep reading this post I wrote for BookWorks

Frances CaballoAuthor of this blogFrances Caballo is an author and social media strategist and manager for writers. She’s a regular speaker at the San Francisco Writers Conference. In addition, she’s a contributing writer at TheBookDesigner.com, and blogger and Social Media Expert for BookWorks. She’s written several social media books including the 2nd edition of Social Media Just for Writers and The Author’s Guide to Goodreads. Her focus is on helping authors surmount the barriers that keep them from flourishing online, building their platform, finding new readers, and selling more books. Her clients include authors of every genre and writers’ conferences. Not sure how you’re doing online? Sign up for my free email course.

Practical tips for marketing your books on the social web

 

Get Your Visuals Seen!

Get your visuals on Pinterest. But first learn how to use Pinterest. Pick up a copy of my book, Pinterest Just for Writers!

 

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10 Pinterest Tips for Writers

10 Pinterest Tips for Writers

In today’s post, I want to share some of my best Pinterest Tips for Writers.

Whenever I feel beleaguered from reading email, blog posts, tweets, and Facebook updates, I sneak over to Pinterest and feast on the images.

Opening Pinterest is a well-deserved break from the blocks of text I normally read on blog posts, newsletters, and social media posts.

Don’t mistake me; Pinterest isn’t just a vacation for my eyes. It’s a powerful social media network that, research indicates, nearly rivals Facebook in terms of traffic referral.

I take time to use it professionally and value its power.

In fact, according to Shareaholic, Pinterest accounts for three times more traffic referral than Google+, Twitter, YouTube, Reddit, StumbleUpon, and LinkedIn all together. Wow!

If you thought Pinterest was for the DIY, beauty, and crafts aficionados, think again. Men are discovering Pinterest and there are numerous ways for writers to use Pinterest to market their books and connect with readers, prospective readers, and colleagues.

10 Quick Pinterest Tips for Writers

  1. Create a pinboard for your blog and save the images from your blog to your pinboard. Whenever you save images from your website or blog, the web address will attach to the image. Then when users click your image, they will travel to your website and read your post and hopefully navigate to other pages on your website. Below is an example of a video I pinned to my pinboard of blogging images. Yes, you can save videos to your pinboards!

Sharon Hamilton2. Do you have trouble getting your writing started in the morning? Create a pinboard of visual writing prompts and share them on Twitter and Facebook.

Pinterest

  1. Repin images that represent the venues where characters in your novels and stories live and travel to. This board of mine is titled Barcelona and I created it for a future novel.

10 Pinterest Tips for Writers

  1. Find images that represent the clothing your characters wear and the meals they enjoy. Here’s an example of a dress a character might wear in a historical fiction novel.

Historical fiction novel

  1. Create a pinboard of your favorite books.

10 Pinterest Tips for Writers

  1. Create a pinboard of books your colleagues have written. This will help your colleagues’s books enjoy greater awareness on Pinterest. Here’s a book cover from my friend and colleague, Sharon Hamilton.

Sharon Hamilton

 

  1. Do you love bookstores? Create a pinboard of beautiful bookstores from around the world.

10 Pinterest Tips for Writers

  1. Writers love libraries, right? Create a pinboard of libraries from around the world.

 

libraries [Read more…]

8 Tools for Writers Who Use Pinterest

8 Tools Just for Writers Who Use PinterestDid you recently publish a book? And have you started a blog?

Congratulate yourself if you answered yes to those questions.

Now, here’s my follow-up question: Have you started using Pinterest yet?

According to Alexa, Facebook is the third most trafficked website (following Google in first place and YouTube in second place), and it can be grand for nurturing relationships. But as writers, especially if you write romance, women’s fiction, or family saga, you can’t afford to ignore the power of Pinterest.

Pinterest is so good at sending traffic to blogs and book sales pages that we can no longer afford to think of this social media platform as a “woman’s” platform. (I mean, have you seen the pictures of muscle cars there not to mention men’s workout clothes?)

Statistics Prove the Effectiveness of Marketing with Pinterest

Check out these statistics for how well Pinterest can drive traffic to your blog (or any other landing page):

  • A pin is 100 times more spreadable than your average tweet, according to Kissmetrics.
  • Per Search Engine Watch, Pinterest pins deliver two site visits and six page views on average, plus more than ten re-pins – and this can continue for several months.
  • The life of a pin (an image) is one week. Compare that to five hours for Facebook and 24 minutes for Twitter. Source is Tailwind Blog

If you haven’t started using Pinterest, open an account. If you use Pinterest, you’ll find these tools for writers helpful.

8 Tools for Writers Who Use Pinterest

Viraltag LogoViraltag

For $24/month, you can use Viraltag to schedule and post images to ten social profiles including Pinterest, Tumblr, Twitter, and Facebook. Upload and schedule multiple posts at once – plan for an entire week or even an entire month. Viraltag also connects directly to your Google Drive and Dropbox accounts to pull content in bulk.

Everypost

Everypost starts with a free post on one platform. For $9.99/month, you can post to ten social media channels. One of the platforms you can schedule your images to is, of course, Pinterest. You can also use Everypost to find visual content to post.

Buffer

If you select the Awesome plan, which costs $10/month, you can schedule updates to Pinterest as well as Instagram, Google+, LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter.

Tailwind

Use this app to schedule images on both Pinterest and Instagram. You can get started on this application for free and decide whether or not you like it. You can also use this application to discover content to post. A real plus.

Chrome Extensions for Pinterest Make Pinning Effortless 

If you navigate to Chrome’s extension store, you’ll find these tools. 

Pinterest Save Button

When you add this extension to your Chrome taskbar, you’ll be able to save any idea or image you fine on the web so you can easily get back to it later.

Pinterest Chrome Extension

Enjoy using Pinterest Chrome Extension. This app will launch the Pinterest official website.

Pinterest Sort

Use this Chrome extension to sort Boards, create board groups, and do it all “automagically.” The extension promises you less clutter and more pinning.

ShotPin

It’s a simple Chrome browser extension to make it easy to take a screenshot of any web page then share it on Pinterest.

Want to learn more about using Pinterest to drive traffic to your blog and landing pages? Get Pinterest Just for Writers for $5.

 

Frances CaballoAuthor of this blogFrances Caballo is an author and social media strategist and manager for writers. She’s a regular speaker at the San Francisco Writers Conference. In addition, she’s a contributing writer at TheBookDesigner.com, and blogger and Social Media Expert for BookWorks. She’s written several social media books including the 2nd edition of Social Media Just for Writers and The Author’s Guide to Goodreads. Her focus is on helping authors surmount the barriers that keep them from flourishing online, building their platform, finding new readers, and selling more books. Her clients include authors of every genre and writers’ conferences. Not sure how you’re doing online? Sign up for my free email course.

Practical tips for marketing your books on the social web

 

 

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