14 Facebook Pages for Authors to Review

14 Facebook Pages for Authors to Review and Maybe Follow

I tell writers, “Facebook is tough.” Specifically, I am referring to Facebook pages. The organic reach makes it difficult to gain traction at times.

Like it or not, your posts organically reach just 2% of your fans’ newsfeeds.

That’s horrible.

HubSpot (an all-in-one inbound marketing and sales platform) agrees that organic reach on Facebook business pages (aka Facebook author pages) is dismal:

“In January 2018, according to Facebook’s Head of News Feed Adam Mosseri, Facebook began to “shift ranking to make News Feed more about connecting with people and less about consuming media in isolation.”

“As a result, marketing content was poised to take a backseat to content by friends and family — a value that Facebook says it originally had, and that it’s trying to return to. What this means that of the number of people who have Liked your Facebook page, about 10% of them see your posts. This also means that if you want more of your fans to see your posts, you need to provide great content consistently and plan to have a Facebook advertising budget.”

However, worldwide, there are over 2.32 billion monthly active users as of December 31, 2018. With that many users, it’s difficult to ignore Facebook.

And Facebook’s advertising feature is impressive and works exceedingly well and you can use it to boost your reach and find members of your reading demographic on Facebook. With its custom audiences, you can target just about any person, cause, and geographical region with your message.

So let’s take a look at some Facebook pages.

Facebook Pages Authors Need to Watch

There is a lot of variety in how these authors handle their Facebook pages. I like Anne Lamott, Isabel Allende, and Joanna Penn’s pages best.

Anne Lamott 509,111 Likes

Anne LamottAnne Lamott doesn’t post regularly, but she does seem to write her own updates, which is a plus for someone of her standing.

In a recent post, she praised Brain Pickings and Maria Popova. How’s that for networking and helping others out?

In another post, she shared the titles of books she’d read in 2019. As you can see, she’s building great karma with other writers, which is something all authors should do.

A post of her reading from a book triggered 904 Likes, 38 comments, 142 shares, and 29,000 views. Wow!

Be sure to Like her page and emulate what she does.

Isabel Allende 1,072,187 Likes 

Isabel Allende, a native of Chile, writes her posts in both English and Spanish. (Spanish-speaking social media users tend to outnumber other demographics.) In the past, she has shared historical images, birthday messages to the Likes of Gloria Steinem, and information about nonprofits.

I love Isabel Allende’s Facebook author page. She apparently writes posts herself and is very open about her life. On January 5 she wrote this:

Isabel Allende

As you can see, that post has 17,000 Likes, 3,800 comments, and 637 shares.

On December 21, she posted a picture of herself in a market in the town of Achao on the island of Chiloe. That post generated 4,500 Likes, 256 comments, and 235 shares.

Look at Allende’s posts, follow her, and learn from her.

Mark Dawson 28,656 

Compared to Allende, indie thriller author Mark Dawson has fewer page Likes and a great following.

A recent post, Dawson decided to give away a free, signed book. That post triggered 22 Likes and 94 comments. In another post, he asked people to write a review of his books. That post just triggered seven Likes.

It’s worth following Dawson to look for his Facebook ads. They are stellar.

He lacks some engagement on Facebook, but I suspect he’s mostly there for the advertising potential. And having more than 28,000 page Likes is nothing to complain about.

The Creative Penn (Joanna Penn) 25,020 Likes 

Joanna PennJoanna Penn regularly posts to her page. She’s more into Twitter, where she has an active following of more than 84,000 followers.

Her Facebook page has a great profile picture and banner image. She posts information about her podcasts (her podcast is one of the best for authors) and responds to comments her readers leave. Kudos to her!

I suggest you follow her on Twitter, Like her Facebook page, and subscribe to her podcast on iTunes. She knows her stuff and is willing to share her knowledge.

Nick Stephenson 21,302 Likes 

Nick Stephenson, similar to Dawson and Penn, is another British, indie, thriller author. His profile picture reveals his sense of humor and his banner image is perfect in that it points to the sign-up link for his newsletter.

He doesn’t post regularly on Facebook. He posted a funny image of himself in green sneakers on November 9, 2018, and before that a post on March 2. I can’t find examples where he’s replied to readers’ comments either.

It appears that he uses Facebook for the advertising opportunities and focuses on other types of marketing, such as developing a VIP list or street team. He also created an author marketing webinar that he uses to supplement his writing income.

Among the three British, indie, thriller authors, Joanna Penn’s Facebook page is the best.

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Books Lingering on Bookshelves? Try These 18 Book Marketing Tips

10-3-16-18-book-marketing-tipsDo you want to sell more books? Every author does. I know that I do.

The truth is, we can never sell enough books, right? It would always be great to be able to sell another 1,000 books, or 100,000 more, or maybe even 250,000 more. Or even 100 more.

Indie writers regularly contact me wanting to know how they can maximize sales of their books. Some of them dream of the day when their writing can support them – a lofty goal.

If you look at the great success stories of today’s indie authors, they support their careers with writing nonfiction or teaching courses. Look at thriller author Joanna Penn as an example. She has sold almost 500,000 books around the world and in five different languages.

She’s also a New York Times and USA Today bestselling author and was voted one of The Guardian UK Top 100 Creative Professionals in 2013. Also, she has a successful podcast, The Creative Penn.

For all her success, her additional endeavors — courses, nonfiction books, speaker fees — also support her business. The same is true for novelists Mark Dawson and Nick Stephenson.

My point is that to make a living on your writing is possible yet a difficult goal to attain.

Some think that social media in and of itself will sell all the books they want to sell. (Mistake.) Others think reading gigs or guest blogging opportunities will do it.

The hard truth is that there isn’t an easy answer. If there were one, I would share it here. Honestly.

And there isn’t a pill that will suddenly make you a capable marketer. The truth? It takes a lot of work to make it in the publishing business.

But, hey, please don’t let me discourage you. That isn’t the point of this post. What I’m trying to say — perhaps not so eloquently as I’d hoped — is that to sell books as an indie author you need a comprehensive plan.

Ready to roll up your sleeves? Keep reading then.

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So You Want to Be an Indie Author?

Maybe being an indie author is one of the toughest jobs in today’s market, especially if you hope to make it a full-time career. (On the other hand, teaching sounds a lot harder but for the sake of this post, let’s say that being an indie author is the toughest.)

After you undergo the grueling process of writing a book and paying for editors and designers, your have to put on a new hat, that of marketer.

If anyone thinks that writing a book is tough – and a lot of people do – marketing a book is just as hard.

An 18-Point Checklist of Book Marketing Tips

Book marketing requires a multi-prong strategy that consists of the following:

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