The Way We Think About Social Media Is Broken

Why what we think about social media is brokenWhen you first write a book and brave the waters of social media, what are you thinking about?

Be honest.

I know what I was thinking. Sales. Readers. Clients.

It’s a mistake that we all make. We’re enthusiastic. We believe we just wrote the best book ever and we’re eager to turn all those hours we labored over every sentence into something tangible: green dollars. Or euros.

Or maybe we’re more altruistic. What we want is for people to enjoy our book, appreciate our craft.

Regardless of our goals, what we don’t want to see is our books fail to reach people, right?

So perhaps we enter social media with too much naiveté and enthusiasm. We make mistakes. A few trolls get upset with us.

Social Media Learning Curve

Oh, well. We all must travel a learning curve.

The problem is that when we first start out, the way we think about social media is broken. In the beginning, we concern ourselves with two goals: sales and numbers.

We want lots of book sales, and we want high numbers. We want thousands if not millions of Twitter followers, and thousands of Facebook likes. And because we’re new to this work of marketing, it all seems possible, until …

Until a few weeks or a few months pass and we realize that something isn’t working. Our book isn’t selling well and ratcheting up followers isn’t easy.

This is a great moment in our development. Why? Because this is the time when we can start to learn a better way, a truer way, a way that will bring friends and colleagues into our world.

[clickToTweet tweet=”Never over-promote your content via @CaballoFrances” quote=”Never over-promote your content “]

Notice that I didn’t use the word sales. Why? Because if we use social media correctly, the way it was meant to be used, the sales will happen. But first, we must network. We must make friends with our readers, and we must become friendly with other authors who write in our genre.

Listen to Your Readers and Your Niche Influencers

When you first join a new social media network, it’s always a good idea to listen before you jump in with your tweets and status updates. Follow these steps:

  • Lurk nicely. Check out how people write their tweets and status updates. Find your influencers. Look for readers, book bloggers, authors in your niche, and book reviewers.
  • Retweet information that your readers will enjoy.
  • Then get your game on. Write blog posts, and tweet and post them.
  • Create your own images using Canva, a free application, or PicMonkey that you can use to add text to copyright-free images you find on the web or those you take yourself.
  • Find meaningful quotes to share, and create text-based images using your finest lines of writing. Also, share humorous memes and anything and everything related to reading, books, and libraries.
  • Don’t over-promote any of your content. Instead, follow the 80/20 rule: 80% of the time promote other users, other writers, influencers, and your readers; 20% of the time post about your books, blog posts, website, and other offerings you might have.
  • Never say, “Buy my book” or “Read my blog post.” Instead, attract readers to your website, your blog, and Amazon by sharing the best content you can find in your niche.

[clickToTweet tweet=”Minimize self-promotion on social media via @CaballoFrances” quote=”Minimize self-promotion on social media”]

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How to Use Pinterest as an Indie Author

Twitter Just for WritersGrab my recently updated and FREE 39-page eBook on Twitter today. Twitter Just for Writers is the most comprehensive eBook I’ve ever released. You’ll find:

  • Easy to follow instructions on how to get started.
  • Instructions on how to devise a password the will never be hacked.
  • Terms and special hashtags just for authors.
  • A list of applications.
  • Advice on how to select your username and write your bio.
  • Plus guidelines for advanced users!

Download your FREE copy now.


 

 How to Use Pinterest as an Indie Author by Frances Caballo


 

Boost Your Website Traffic with Pinterest

Winston Churchill once said,

To improve is to change; to be perfect is to change often.

Change is certainly the only thing that is constant among all social media networks. You can’t afford to grow comfortable with the way things are because today’s Facebook may look different next year — or even next month.

The same goes for Pinterest. The founders keep arguing that this website is a search engine, but everyone else keeps calling it a social media network. Whatever you call it, Pinterest has changed as well.

If you haven’t been using Pinterest, this post will help you to get started. If you’ve been on Pinterest for some time, you’ll learn about changes that have recently occurred.

We’re Part of a Visual Social Web

Social media has been trending toward a visual social web for the past several years. Take Instagram for example. It’s entirely visual. Tumblr has transitioned increasingly to a visual media website.

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11 Ways You May Be Spooking Your Readers on Social Media

Don't Spook Your Readers on Social Media by Frances CaballoAs a child, I would frighten easily. I never entered a haunted house, and I hated clowns.

More accurately, clowns scared the bejeezus out of me.

And on Halloween one year, I visited neighborhood and when I knocked, instead of seeing a welcoming parent answer the door, a horrifying wolf did. (In reality, it was a tall boy wearing a scary wolf mask.)

I dashed down the stairs and across the street and narrowly escaped being hit by a car.

Do you have similar stories?

Now that we’ve all grown up, you might think that it would be difficult to scare others, especially your readers. Well, that’s not exactly true.

You may not frighten them to the point they scream with horror, but you can do things that will chase them away.


Not sure when to post your social media updates? Get the Cheat Sheet than tells you when. Download now!

Free Social Media Cheat Sheet by Frances Caballo


 

[clickToTweet tweet=”Don’t create a Facebook author page and then abandon it via @CaballoFrances” quote=”Don’t create a Facebook author page and then abandon it via @CaballoFrances”]

Let’s look at eleven situations that might be scaring off your readers, especially new readers.
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